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Faculty Awareness and Training in the Post-Secondary Community: An Annotated Bibliography

University of British Columbia

Vancouver, British Columbia

Teaching Students with Disabilities Guidebook (2nd Edition, 1993)

This 80-page guidebook begins with a mission statement, indicating the desire to make the university a more accessible environment for the increasing number of students with disabilities enrolling. Following that is a definition of the word disability provided by the World Health Organization, and the one adapted from that by the Disability Resource Centre at UBC.

A section on general accommodation strategies states that it is important to remember students with disabilities enter university having completed the same academic standards as other students, but need some accommodations to take proper advantage of their learning environment. It emphasizes treating students with disabilities as you would any other students. A list of national and provincial human rights legislation of use to persons with disabilities, as well as the university commitment as stated in the calendar, is included.

A page on general guidelines for lab situations is also included, providing important information not found in other instructors' guidebooks. It suggests accommodations such as allowing the student to preview the lab environment before entering to work on an assignment, and ensuring equipment and chemicals are labeled with Braille or large print, where necessary.

The disability information section includes definitions of each disability, with instructional strategies, as well as communication strategies detailing what to say and how to act when conversing with a student with a particular disability. Along with the more commonly discussed categories of impairment, there are sections on Epilepsy, mental health impairments, head injuries, chronic health problems and temporary disorders, which provide brief but valuable information and accommodations.

This well-written, clear guide closes with a section on exam accommodation procedures, and a listing of disability resources available through the school and the community.

Contact:
Janet Mee
Director, Disability Resource Centre
University of British Columbia
1874 East Mall
Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1
Phone: 604-822-5844 or 604-822-9049
TTY: 604-822-2226
Email: mee@student-services.ubc.ca
Web site: http://www.student-services.ubc.ca/drc/


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