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High School Transition

Student Success Stories

Photo of Shane Parker



"Take a nap,
play a sport,
learn about
other students’
cultures or
interests."

Shane Parker

In Grade five, Shane Parker’s gym teacher took him under his wing and became his mentor. Shane was under his tutelage all through junior high and high school. As a result of that teacher’s one-on-one assistance, along with Shane’s personal determination and strong work ethic, Shane has found academic success. Shane is a history major in his fourth year at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick. As a student with a learning disability, Shane uses the services of the Meighen Centre for Learning Assistance and Research at Mount Allison.

Shane ensures he is a well-rounded student, mixing course work with extra-curricular activities. He is a varsity athlete, as a member of the Mount Allison Mounties soccer team. He believes a strong body means a strong mind. “Going to university is a marathon, not a sprint,” Shane says. “Don’t leave your work until the last minute. Never pull an all-nighter. It is not worth it and you won’t function well.”

Shane says one study skill he has found helpful is to not devote all his time to academics: “Take a nap, play a sport, learn about other students’ cultures or interests.” He feels that university is not all about grades because there is so much to experience and do. Even though Shane’s grades are important to him, he finds that striking a balance helps one to achieve success and ensures personal satisfaction. Another tip he offers, is to be organized; read the required work before the lecture, then fill in the missing information in your notes after the lecture has ended. Shane also advises students to create their own system of note taking, like shorthand, so you can write the information down quickly. Don’t take word-for-word notes, but instead condense your notes so they are easy to read at exam time, he suggests.

Shane’s advice for someone in high school is: “don’t be deterred in continuing your education because you have a learning disability. Accommodations are available at most post-secondary institutions.” He said that the professors have been extremely accommodating at his university. Most professors are willing and able to give him time and a half on an exam as long as he has the professor fill out the proper administrative forms. An important factor in his choice to go to Mount Allison University was the presence of the Meighen Centre, which has a reputation as one of the best service centres in the country. Other reasons he chose Mount Allison were that attending the school is a family tradition, and it is an excellent undergraduate university.




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